NPR : News

Filed Under:

Hamas Ban On Female Runners Spurs Cancellation Of Gaza Marathon

Gaza's U.N.-organized marathon has been canceled because Islamist Hamas movement, which rules the area, refused to allow women to run.

The race, scheduled for April 10, would have been the third annual UNRWA Gaza Marathon. In a statement, the U.N. Relief and Works Agency said it "regrets" the decision.

Here's more from the statement:

"UNRWA regrets to announce that it has cancelled the third Gaza marathon which was to be held on 10 April. This follows the decision by the authorities in Gaza not to allow women to participate."

More than 250 international runners had registered for the race; 119 of them women.

The marathon raises funds for the U.N. agency's summer program for children in Gaza.

A Hamas official told the AFP news agency that the organization didn't "want men and women running together."

"We did not tell UNRWA to cancel the marathon and we haven't prevented it, but we laid down some conditions: We don't want women and men mixing in the same place," Abdessalam Siyyam, cabinet secretary of the Hamas government, told AFP.

He added: "We don't want any women [16 and over] running uncovered."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.