Obenshain's Concealed Handgun And Voter ID Bills May Become Hot Topics | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Obenshain's Concealed Handgun And Voter ID Bills May Become Hot Topics

Two laws that passed through Virginia's General Assembly that gained a lot of initial attention, but received little follow-up, are likely to become hot topics in the near future. That's because Sen. Mark Obenshain, the lawmaker who sponsored the bills, is running for attorney general.

Obenshain's voter ID bill was one of the most talked-about bills this session. It eliminates varying forms of identification without photos that were just approved last year.

Democrats still argue that this bill is overreaching and disenfranchises voters. Obenshain says it is a common sense bill that's received broad support in some polls. But another bill that's headed to Gov. Bob McDonnell's desk revolves around the gun control debate, which Obenshain says is another "common sense privacy measure."

This became a hot-button issue after Virginia and New York newspapers published the names of concealed-carry holders after the Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook shootings.

Obenshain's bill prohibits circuit court clerks from publicly disclosing an applicant's name and other identifying information contained in a concealed handgun permit application.

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