WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Maryland Public Service Commission Tells Utilities To Toughen Up

Play associated audio
Critics have said Pepco's response to last summer's derecho was slow and ineffectual.
Rebecca Cooper
Critics have said Pepco's response to last summer's derecho was slow and ineffectual.

Eight months after a Derecho storm ripped through the region, the Maryland Public Service Commission has ordered utility companies to improve the resiliency and reliability of their electric distribution infrastructure.

The late June storm brought powerful straight-line winds to Maryland from the Midwest. It toppled trees and tree limbs, which in turn pulled down overhead power lines, accounting for 32 million hours of service interruption. At its peak, nearly 1 million people were without power.

Today, in the wake of eight public hearings, the MPSC issued a dictum directing utilities to harden their distribution systems to improve reliability. They also cautioned power companies to communicate more effectively and mend the disconnect between the public's expectations and the ability of the present-day electric systems to meet those expectations

NPR

A Biography Of Your Cubicle: How This Became The Modern Workplace

The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
NPR

California Farmers Finagle A Fig For All Seasons

Two growers are competing to harvest fresh figs earlier and earlier in hopes of transforming the industry for year-round production. But some fig lovers say they can hold out for summer fruit.
NPR

Report Decries A Cozy Relationship Shared By DHS And Watchdog

A Senate panel released a report Thursday that criticizes the inspector general of the Department of Homeland Security. It accuses him of repeatedly compromising his independence.
NPR

Rural Hospitals Weigh Independence Against Need For Computer Help

Hospitals in out-of-the-way places are making trade-offs as they adopt electronic medical records. Some are joining larger health systems, while others are searching for ways to go it alone.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.