WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Md. Senate Accepts Controversial Changes To Gun Control Legislation

One provision in the Maryland gun law would require fingerprinting with the purchase of a handgun.
Keith Lafaille: http://www.flickr.com/photos/klafaille/6218726857/
One provision in the Maryland gun law would require fingerprinting with the purchase of a handgun.

The Maryland Senate has voted to accept some changes to Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun-control measure.

The Senate voted 28-19 on Wednesday to accept 19 of 20 amendments made by the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last week, according to the Associated Press.

The Senate decided to consider the other amendment on its own, after it sparked significant debate. This measure would automatically take away the firearms of anyone voluntarily or involuntarily committed for mental health treatment.

Baltimore City Senator Bill Ferguson noted that today's vote to accept the 19 amendments is not enough to stop an expected filibuster by opponents on this issue.

One of the most contentious aspects of the legislation would require fingerprints from people who buy handguns. The bill also would ban assault weapons.

Debate on additional amendments is scheduled to continue throughout the week. A final vote on the measure is expected on Friday.

NPR

So This Is How They Do It! Zebras Getting Stripes

The pink on a flamingo? Stripes on a zebra? Spots on a giraffe? All explained. Simply. Elegantly. Oddly.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Obama Adds Malaysia To His Asia Itinerary

Obama travels to Malaysia next week, where the government is under fire for the handling of a missing airliner. NPR's Wade Goodwyn talks to Joshua Kurlantzick of the Council on Foreign Relations.
NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.