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Petition Calls On McDonnell To Eliminate 'Hybrid Tax'

Activists decried the inclusion of a tax on alternative fuel vehicles in a protest in January.
Armando Trull
Activists decried the inclusion of a tax on alternative fuel vehicles in a protest in January.

The Virginia Senate passed a bill overhauling transportation funding in the state on Saturday, sending the bill to Gov. Bob McDonnell to sign. Two lawmakers from Northern Virginia are still keeping up the fight to keep a tax on alternative fuel vehicles, the so-called "hybrid tax," out of the legislation.

Mt. Vernon Del. Scott Surovell and Alexandria Sen. Adam Ebbin have launched a website called NoHybridTax.com. The petition calls on the governor to repeal the provision in the transportation deal that would charge hybrid owners $100 a year.

During negotiations to reconcile the two versions, McDonnell explained that since alternative fuel vehicles utilize less gas, they generate less revenue for the state. He said the hybrid provision is intended as a way for hybrid owners to continue to contribute to the transportation fund.

The transportation funding deal passed by the Senate replaces the 17.5 cent-per-gallon tax on gasoline with a 3.5 percent wholesale tax. It also raises statewide sales taxes from 5 to 5.3 percent.

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