WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Federal Cuts Could Affect National Zoo

Play associated audio
Cheetahs roaming outside at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. on February 22, 2013.
Markette Smith
Cheetahs roaming outside at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. on February 22, 2013.

If Congress doesn't decide on a budget agreement by March 1, hundreds of thousands of jobs will be cut or furloughed, with the Defense Department alone, slashing nearly $43 billion.

"My husband works for DoD, and he's going to be furloughed possibly for 22 days," said one stay-at-home mom, who asked that her name not be mentioned. She spent the afternoon with her toddler at the National Zoo.

But her days spent doing leisurely things like this are numbered if her husband, "the bread winner," doesn't work in March.

"I'm having to find a job, because who can go a month without pay? " she said.

Even the Zoo will likely be affected. Staffers tell the Washington Post that sweeping budget cuts over the long term could force popular, yet expensive, exhibits to close.

"They seemed to be able to get things right with the fiscal cliff and resolve that with minimal impact, and hopefully that can happen with the case here," said Jason Smith, who walked briskly by the National Zoo on his way to Metro.

If a deal isn't met, automatic cuts of $85 billion go into effect.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.