Chinese Students Wore Uniforms With Cancer-Causing Dyes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Chinese Students Wore Uniforms With Cancer-Causing Dyes

Students in 21 schools in the Chinese city of Shanghai have been ordered to stop wearing uniforms that were found to contain a dye that causes cancer.

NPR's Frank Langfitt is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit. Here's his report:

"The toxic dye was detected in a batch of uniforms produced by the Shanghai Ouxia garment company, according to the city government. The company, which has stopped production, sold 15,000 school uniforms annually. The state-run Shanghai Daily said the clothing had appeared on quality blacklists for the past several years. Prices of uniforms for primary and middle school students are capped at $24. Some garment makers have cut corners by using low-quality materials."

The Shanghai Daily quoted city government officials saying students will be allowed to attend schools in regular clothes. The newspaper reported that Shanghai Ouxia, the garment company, had used aromatic amine dyes, which are banned and can cause cancer.

Here's more from the newspaper:

"School officials admitted that they never check suppliers' product quality test reports, a step that is not mandatory in procurement. It was not until recent quality tests by Shanghai quality authorities found the dye that they knew the products were problematic."

But as Frank reported for Newscast, this is not the first quality-related issue in China.

"Other quality-related health hazards here include using recycled cooking oil — or "gutter oil" — in restaurants. Last year, a man in East China's Shandong province stood trial for selling up to 12,000 tons of gutter oil – much of which he'd allegedly obtained from sewers."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Scott Simon: 'We Don't Fully Grow Up' Until We Lose Our Parents

"There are some lessons that only grief and responsibility can teach us," says Weekend Edition host Scott Simon. His new memoir, Unforgettable, is about the life and death of his mother.
NPR

The Revival Of Lamb Ham: A Colonial Tradition Renewed

British colonialists brought lamb ham to America, where a sugar-cured, smoked variety became popular. Easier-to-cure pork ham eventually took its place, but now two Virginians are bringing it back.
WAMU 88.5

Streetcar, 'Accountability' Among Key Points Of Bowser Address

D.C.'s new mayor said the H Street streetcar would survive and that "accountability" — from police, politicians and other officials — would be a defining aspect of her administration.

WAMU 88.5

Uber Tweaks Airport Pickups To Create 'Virtual Queue'

Faced with rules that prevent its drivers from hanging out on airport property waiting for rides, Uber is tweaking its system for ride-hailing pick-ups at Reagan National and Dulles International airports.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.