WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Senate Passes Violence Against Women Act

Play associated audio

Last week the U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, and the legislation is now sitting in the House.

The Senate-passed legislation extends protections to the LGBT community and immigrants, which is upsetting some Republicans. Maryland Democratic Rep. Donna Edwards says those complaints ring hollow.

"I worked in shelters," she says. "When somebody comes in and they're victimized, we don't ask them where did they come from, all of those details... what we want to do is figure out how do we get programs and services to people who have been victimized by a crime."

Republicans also don't like that the Senate bill allows tribal courts to prosecute non-natives who abuse native women on reservations. The legislation hasn't been authorized since 2011, which Edwards say is hurting local communities.

"Over 2,500 shelters and domestic violence programs that are right now being starved because we're fooling over something that really just should not have a D or and R in front of it," she says.

House leaders have not scheduled a vote on Violence Against Women Act yet.

WAMU 88.5

A Conversation With "Broad City" Co-Star Abbi Jacobson

What do Michelle Obama, Anna Wintour and Michael Jordan carry in their bags? Abbi Jacobson imagines the things you might find in her new illustrated book, "Carry This Book." We talk to the "Broad City" co-star about what you can learn from the contents of bags—and her success creating and starring in the hit Comedy Central show.

WAMU 88.5

New Approaches To Tackling Local Youth Hunger

The First Lady of Virginia Dorothy McAuliffe and other regional leaders are exploring new, innovative ways to combat local food insecurity.

WAMU 88.5

What Washington Really Thinks of the Rest of America

Kojo explores the surprising findings of a Johns Hopkins survey on what D.C.'s federal workers and unelected policy makers really think of the American public.


Researchers Build 'Nightmare Machine'

An MIT project rolled out just in time for Halloween uses artificial intelligence to generate horror images.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.