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The State Of The Union In 10 Headlines

Since what's said and written about a State of the Union address on the morning after can determine what's most remembered about such speeches, let's look at Wednesday's headlines:

-- NPR's It's All Politics: "Obama To Congress: With Or Without You."

-- The New York Times: "Obama Pledges Push to Lift Economy for Middle Class."

-- CNN: "State Of The Union Brings Out More Of The 'Same Old, Same Old.' "

-- Politico: "Obama Calls For 'Common Sense' Solutions."

-- The Wall Street Journal: "Obama Urges Action On Expansive Agenda."

-- Fox News: "Obama Presses For New Spending, Says Gun Control Bills 'Deserve A Vote.' "

-- Bloomberg News: "Obama Paints Wider Role For Government In Middle Class."

-- BBC News: "Obama Pledges To Reignite Economy."

-- The Weekly Standard's Fred Barnes (conservative): "There He Goes Again."

-- Firedoglake's Kevin Gosztola (liberal): "Afghanistan Drawdown & the Covert Drone War."

We welcome headline suggestions. Add them in the comments thread.

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