MWAA Board Targeted Pro-Labor Members In Silver Line Struggle | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

MWAA Board Targeted Pro-Labor Members In Silver Line Struggle

Play associated audio
The ouster of two pro-labor MWAA board members helped ensure the survival of Phase 2 of the Silver Line to Dulles Airport.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dcmetroblogger/8255018169/
The ouster of two pro-labor MWAA board members helped ensure the survival of Phase 2 of the Silver Line to Dulles Airport.

A former board member of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority is accusing the agency's leaders of not telling the whole truth when they testified before Congress, and 23 pages of internal emails suggest three current board members worked with officials in Richmond to remove one of their colleagues.

MWAA is trying to rebuild the public's trust after a tumultuous 2012. But key agency members who remain in their posts were involved in the political maneuvering that ended in the resignations of two pro-labor, Democratic board members their opponents say were threatening the completion of the Silver Line: Mame Reiley and Dennis Martire.

Internal emails obtained by WAMU suggest that Republican board members Tom Davis, Todd Stottlemyer and Rusty Conner (a Democrat reappointed by Gov. Bob McDonnell) were aware of McDonnell's intention to remove Dennis Martire from the MWAA board and communicated with Republican officials in Richmond to secure Martire's removal.

Former MWAA board member Bob Brown, a Democrat, says agency CEO Jack Potter and board vice-chairman Tom Davis were not entirely honest when they told members of a House subcommittee last November that the hiring of Mame Reiley to a staff position was only Potter's idea.

'Not illegal, but against the grain'

Reiley resigned from the board in February of 2012, citing health concerns, and began her new, $180,000 per year position shortly thereafter.

"Nobody did anything illegal, but it goes against the grain, of the notion of these kinds of non-political regional agencies," said Brown.

Brown says Davis, who was appointed by McDonnell, orchestrated the hiring of Reiley to a special position created for her. Brown says he knows this because both Reiley and Davis told him so.

"Tom was the one that conceived of the idea of how to persuade Mame Reiley to resign her seat and open up that prior Democratic appointment for McDonnell to fill," Brown says.

By replacing Reiley on the MWAA board of directors with Todd Stottlemyer, the McDonnell administration secured another Republican vote against a pro-labor provision included in the bidding process for Phase 2 of the Silver Line. McDonnell and Republicans in the General Assembly fought against that provision, known as a PLA or project labor agreement, and the all-Republican Loudoun County Board of Supervisors threatened to pull out of the project over it.

MWAA had defended the pro-labor provision against these attacks for months, but bowed to this pressure and voted to kill the PLA on June 6.

Davis denies he orchestrated Reiley's hiring. Reiley did not return calls and emails seeking comment.

"There are other people, who I am not going to get into, that basically initiated this conversation," Davis said. "I didn't have a dog in that fight but I thought getting her off the board frankly at that point would be a win-win for everybody.  So I acquiesced and didn't raise an objection to it."

Potter, the MWAA CEO, finalized Reiley's hiring and continues to take sole responsibility for the decision — a decision that was among questionable dealings highlighted in an audit by the U.S. Department of Transportation last year.

"I stand by what I testified in front of Congress. I made the decision on the hiring and it was my sole decision. I made the decision to hire Mame Reiley, period," Potter told WAMU 88.5 in an interview this week.

Potter noted in his November testimony, "My judgment was not good in terms of the hiring of that person."  He added, however, that the position was necessary to develop land to offset rising costs at Dulles International Airport.

Davis testified at the same hearing that he knew the job was being created for Reiley.

"I was aware. There were board members it was run by," Davis testified. "This was a complicated situation."

Board members emailed about Martire's ouster

McDonnell on June 14 attempted to remove Dennis Martire from MWAA's board "for cause."  It was just one week after the board voted to remove the pro-labor provision from the bid process. Martire supported the PLA but had also been embarrassed by accusations that he abused MWAA's travel policy.

But Davis, Stottlemyer, and board member Rusty Conner knew of the governor's intention to dump Martire in February — four months earlier, according to emails sent by the three men, which were obtained from a Fairfax Circuit Court filing.

In an email sent on Feb. 18, 2012 Davis wrote to David Speck, a former MWAA board member and member of Virginia's House of Delegates.

"I think they will try to remove Denny so that means two more [board] openings," the email from Davis reads. " [Virginia Transportation Secretary] Sean Connaughton is the key decision maker. It may be helpful for them to keep this bipartisan."

A Fairfax Circuit Court judge blocked the governor's attempt to remove Martire. The board member eventually settled his legal dispute with the commonwealth and agreed to resign his board seat.

Davis admitted he wanted Martire off the board, but insists it was not for political reasons, and that there was nothing improper in him supporting the labor leader's removal.

"My job was to try to get a rail system built. This board was dysfunctional. It wasn't just the PLA. It was the lack of transparency. There were 20 things going wrong at that point," Davis told WAMU 88.5 in an interview.

One of those things going wrong was the insertion of the labor agreement into the bidding process for Phase 2 of the Silver Line, which would have awarded contractors a bonus in their bidding scores if they agreed to enter into a voluntarily labor agreement with the workforce building the rail line. As a right-to-work state, Virginia's General Assembly voted to withhold $150 million in funding if the PLA provision remained.

Project costs would have escalated under the project labor agreement, Davis argues. But Potter sees a value in such agreements; he credits the PLA in Phase 1's construction with keeping the project on time and on budget.

Bids for Phase 2 of the Silver Line construction are due by April 19.

In mid-May, Davis emailed fellow board member Conner, telling him that the PLA would be overturned June 6. Conner emailed back.

"Call Sean [Connaughton] and tell him not to pull the trigger on Martire until the 7th," Connor's email reads, referring to the Virginia transportation secretary.

But Connaughton says it wasn't his call; that the Governor had the final say on Martire's removal.

"The airports authority members are supposed to be representing the interests of the people that they were appointed by," Connaughton said. "Each one is governed by the laws of the jurisdictions that appointed them.  They are not supposed to be off doing things that are contrary to the interest of the jurisdictions in the region."

Can MWAA be insulated from politics?

Despite MWAA's efforts to turn over a new leaf on ethics and practices, one government watchdog said the continued political infighting will affect the agency's ability to perform its duties.

"Given all that has gone in the past couple of years with the board, it really seems like the best course of action would be a clean sweep and an entirely new set of board members," said Melanie Sloan, the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

Both the MWAA board chairman Michael Curto and CEO Jack Potter should also resign after being implicated in the DOT audit, Sloan said.

"It's impossible for the public to have confidence in board members who engage in conduct like that," she said.


[Music: "Chemistry (In the Style of Semisonic)" by Karoake Bliss]

NPR

Antarctic Holiday: A Christmas Feast In The Loneliest Spot On Earth

For Dr. Gavin Francis, Christmas Eve marked the start of a year-long stay in an icy research base 8,700 miles from home. In this "empire of ice and isolation," he says, food is essential to morale.
NPR

Antarctic Holiday: A Christmas Feast In The Loneliest Spot On Earth

For Dr. Gavin Francis, Christmas Eve marked the start of a year-long stay in an icy research base 8,700 miles from home. In this "empire of ice and isolation," he says, food is essential to morale.
NPR

'Rum, Rumba, And Romance': A Book On Cuba's Enduring Mystique

This week, President Obama announced that he will begin to normalize relations with Cuba. Cuban-American writer Richard Blanco recommends a book about Cuba's imprint on the American imagination.
NPR

Obama Says 'James Flacco.' The Internet Says, Thank You

It was an honest mistake. But when President Obama said "James Flacco" when referring to James Franco — on a Friday before the holidays, no less — the slip was eagerly received online.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.