Behind The Mic: Here's Why The 11 A.M. Newscast Was All 'Live' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Behind The Mic: Here's Why The 11 A.M. Newscast Was All 'Live'

Play associated audio

We don't usually write about what happens in the NPR newsroom. That old line about not wanting to know how the sausage is made certainly applies in most cases.

But if you were tuned in at 11 a.m. ET and the newscast sounded a little different, it's because some technical gremlins got hold of the pre-recorded reports from NPR's correspondents and wouldn't let go. So, it was "live radio" time.

Which meant that this blogger got to spent a few moments on the air talking with newscaster Paul Brown about the California manhunt story. Then the real radio professionals — Dave Mattingly, Craig Windham and Korva Coleman followed. They had conversations with Paul about today's retail sales report, cyber security, and the president's climate change proposals.

It was a bit of a circus as everyone switched places at the microphone. Thankfully, there had been time to prepare notes or to grab the scripts that had been written for the reports that were stuck somewhere in our audio system.

We'll embed the audio. Hopefully, you'll think it all worked out OK in the end.

The gremlins, by the way, have disappeared. Things are back to normal now. So, this blogger's 60 seconds of radio fame have come and gone.

Update at 12:55 p.m. ET. Everbody's A Comic:

A "friend" just stopped by to say "you've got a voice for the blog."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Hollywood's Acceptance Of White Privilege Revealed By Sony Hack

While some leaked Sony emails seemed racist, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says they hint at a wider issue: an acceptance of practices, habits and perceptions that limit diversity in Hollywood.
NPR

Nutmeg Spice Has A Secret Story That Isn't So Nice

Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan in the 1600s.
WAMU 88.5

Special Prosecutors Should Handle Civilian Shootings By Police, Holmes Norton Says

Norton says mayors and governors could stem anger over civilian shootings by police by appointing special prosecutors to handle them.
NPR

Hollywood's Acceptance Of White Privilege Revealed By Sony Hack

While some leaked Sony emails seemed racist, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says they hint at a wider issue: an acceptance of practices, habits and perceptions that limit diversity in Hollywood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.