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What To Serve At A State Of The Union Party: 'Sour Grapes And Whine'

Plenty of people are ready to offer advice on noshing options when it comes to the Super Bowl. But what do you serve when the occasion for gathering in front of our screens is President Obama's State of the Union address?

When NPR White House correspondent Ari Shapiro posed that question to his 125,000 Facebook followers earlier Tuesday, plenty of people jumped at the chance to toss off a bon mot.* Among our favorites:

Of course, you could just skip the edibles and jump right to one of the many drinking games that tend to circulate on the Internet when the president's address rolls around each year. (The rules vary depending on the game, but you can bet that if Obama declares the state of the union is "strong," yep, you'll be drinking.)

But you won't find Ari knocking back those shots — or at any soirees.

"I'm the NPR equivalent of the cabinet member who sits out SOTU in case a catastrophe befalls the capitol," he tells The Salt. "I'll watch the speech from home, waking up early tomorrow to travel with Obama to North Carolina."

*It's Mardi Gras, so we're going French here.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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'We're Mostly Republicans': New Hampshire Voters Explained By 'Our Town'

After NPR's Bob Mondello used The Music Man to help explain the Iowa caucuses, he wished there was a musical of Our Town so he could do the same for New Hampshire. It turns out there is one.
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Gulf Of Mexico Open For Fish-Farming Business

For the first time, companies can apply to set up fish farms in U.S. federal waters. The government says the move will help reduce American dependence on foreign seafood and improve security.
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Jeb Bush Finds His Stride In New Hampshire, But Is It Too Late?

The former Florida governor finally seems at ease on the campaign trail. Is he peaking at the right time or have months of missteps made it just too much for him to overcome?
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Blocked: Twitter's Role In Combating Violent Extremism

Over the course of seven months, Twitter has suspended over 125,000 accounts for threatening or promoting terrorist acts.

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