WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia House Votes To Protect Concealed Handgun Permit Holders

Play associated audio
http://www.flickr.com/photos/thruhike98/2047207259/

The Virginia House of Delegates has passed legislation to keep the names of concealed handgun permit holders secret.

The original Senate bill prohibited court clerks from publicly disclosing the names and information of concealed-carry permit-holders shielded by protective orders. A House panel amended the bill to include all Virginians with concealed handgun permits.

Del. Joe Morrissey argued against it on the House floor.

"With respect to building permits, or residential and commercial permits, planning and zoning permits, land use permits, transportation environmental service permits, health service permits: I'd ask the gentleman again, can he name one permit issued by a government entity that is not discoverable or cannot be disclosed?" Morrissey said.

Del. Todd Gilbert said this bill protects a fundamental right.

"There are any number of reasons why the publication of that information is not only dangerous but an invasion of privacy and, frankly, offensively stigmatizing to law-abiding people who are treated like these newspapers have treated them as, you know, people who belong on some list to be watched, much like we treat sex offenders," Gilbert said

The bill now goes back to the Senate, which can accept or reject the amendment.

NPR

A Photographer Gets Old — Over And Over — In 'The Many Sad Fates'

Photographer Phillip Toledano lost both his parents, an aunt and an uncle and began to wonder — what other dark turns did life have in store? He explores the possibilities in a new short film.
NPR

This Historian Wants You To Know The Real Story Of Southern Food

Michael Twitty wants credit given to the enslaved African-Americans who were part of Southern cuisine's creation. So he goes to places like Monticello to cook meals slaves would have eaten.
NPR

Barbershop: Trump's Comments And Latinos

Linda Chavez of the Center for Equal Opportunity, Denise Galvez of Latinas for Trump and columnist Gustavo Arellano discuss Donald Trump's week of comments about a former Miss Universe.
NPR

We May Die, But Our Tweets Can Live Forever

A new exhibit explores what people leave behind online after they die. BuzzFeed senior writer Doree Shafrir discusses what it was like to attend her own "digital funeral."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.