Smoking Ban Passes In Montgomery County | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Smoking Ban Passes In Montgomery County

Play associated audio
Buses and county-leased homes are now included under the smoking ban.
Elvert Barnes: http://www.flickr.com/photos/perspective/6009966019/
Buses and county-leased homes are now included under the smoking ban.

The Montgomery County council has expanded the area's smoking ban.

The vote was unanimous to extend the smoking ban to nearly all county-owned property. That includes bus stops and bus shelters, which were added to the original bill despite concerns about how the ban would be enforced at those locations.

Councilman George Leventhal says he doesn't expect people to call the police to report smokers at bus stops and shelters.

"The culture has changed and we anticipate that, as in elevators, as at people's desks, as at other places where people congregate, it will just become acknowledged as improper to smoke at bus stops and bus shelters," Leventhal says.

Also added to the expanded ban are homes that are on county-owned or leased property. But tenants who live in those homes now would not have to follow it. Only those who move into those houses once the expanded ban takes effect would have to comply.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 18

You can attend an annual Latin American film festival or see a new play about strength, war and family.

NPR

From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.
NPR

Senate To Vote On Arming Rebels As Islamic State Seizes Villages

The Islamist rebels reportedly have captured 16 Kurdish villages in northern Syria in a major push for territory. The move has prompted fears of a massacre against civilians.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.