WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Cardinal Donald Wuerl To Help Choose New Pope

Play associated audio

Archbishop of Washington Cardinal Donald Wuerl, who guides the D.C. area's Catholics, learned Monday morning that he will soon travel to Rome to help choose the next pope.

Wuerl says he was as surprised as many in the Catholic world over Pope Benedict XVI's decision to step down at the end of the month.

Wuerl called the decision courageous. "I think it's a sign of the great humility of this pope and his love of the church and his courage," he says.

"It's a little reminiscent of George Washington giving up his office," says Brian, one local Catholic that asked that his last name not be used. "As an American, one can think of that."

Pope Benedict XVI will become the first pontiff to step down in 600 years. A conservative, he found himself at odds with some American Catholics on issues such as women in the priesthood, contraception, abortion, and gay rights.

Wuerl will be part of the conclave tasked with choosing the next pontiff.

"There is a basic doctrine that is a bedrock or is Catholic faith," he says. "So I suspect that every pope is always going to be conscious of the need to proclaim the received tradition of the church. And then the challenge is living with that and applying that to the moment, to the circumstances of our day."

NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
NPR

How The Humble Orange Sweet Potato Won Researchers The World Food Prize

A public health campaign to sell Africans on the virtues of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes — bred for higher Vitamin A levels — has helped combat malnutrition on the continent.
NPR

Fact Check: Trump's Speech On The Economy Annotated

NPR's politics team has annotated Donald Trump's Tuesday speech on the economy.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.