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Cuccinelli's New Book Targets Obama Administration, Social Programs

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Virginia attorney general Ken Cuccinelli says that his new book "wasn't written for politics."
Gage Skidmore:mhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/6238582161/
Virginia attorney general Ken Cuccinelli says that his new book "wasn't written for politics."

If Virginia's attorney general needs to appeal to moderate Republicans in his campaign for governor, his new book probably isn't going to help.

"The Last Line of Defense'' targets what Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli contends is federal government overreach. It claims politicians use programs like Social Security and Medicare to trap people in a cycle of government dependency and boost their own power. It also labels the Obama administration the biggest set of lawbreakers in America, according to the Associated Press.

"Sometimes bad politicians set out to grow government in order to increase their own power and influence," Cuccinelli writes. "The amazing thing is that they often grow government without protest from citizens, and sometimes they even get buy-in from citizens - at least from the ones getting the goodies."

Those are points sure to resonate with his conservative base and provide fodder for opponents to use against him in the governor's race.

Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, who abandoned his bid for the GOP nomination and is said to be weighing a run as an independent, says he disagrees with the excerpts he's seen from the book.

"I don't think it's smart or productive to make comments that could be interpreted as criticizing everyone who receives a benefit from government," Bolling said in a written statement. "Not every government program is bad, and not everyone who receives a government benefit is dependent on government."

Cuccinelli says nothing in the book that's inconsistent with his record in public office.

The book will be released Tuesday.

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