NPR : News

Filed Under:

Mr. Bean's Supercar Crash Racks Up $1.4 Million Repair Bill

Rowan Atkinson, the British comedian who's probably best known to Americans as Mr. Bean, is in the record books for something that's not all that funny.

According to reports from The Scotsman and other news outlets in the U.K., Atkinson's insurers paid 910,000 British pounds (about $1.4 million) to repair the McLaren F1 supercar that he wrecked in 2011. That's a U.K. record, newspapers say.

The bill is about 42 percent more than the 640,000 pounds Atkinson paid for the car in 1997, the Scotsman says. The reason the car is worth fixing: its value has soared. One "immaculate model" sold for 3.5 million pounds ($5.5 million) last year, adds the Scotsman.

Atkinson was not seriously injured in the crash. Don't assume, by the way, that he drives like his Mr. Bean character would. As fans of Top Gear will tell you, he's long been near or atop the show's ranking of celebrities who drive a "reasonably priced car" around a test track. He's nuts about cars, as was clear when he sat down with Top Gear.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.
NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
NPR

Jon Stewart's Private White House Meetings

Comedian Jon Stewart was called to the White House on at least two occasions for private meetings with President Obama, according to Politico. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with reporter Darren Samuelsohn.
NPR

An App Tells Painful Stories Of Slaves At Monticello's Mulberry Row

A new app uses geolocation to bring to life a lesser-known section of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate — Mulberry Row, which was the bustling enclave of skilled slaves who worked at Monticello.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.