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366,000 New Claims For Jobless Benefits, Down Only Slightly

There were 366,000 first-time clams for unemployment insurance last week, down just 5,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

Of note: that number from the previous week — 371,000 — is an upward revision. A week ago, the agency estimated there had been 368,000 claims over that period.

Basically, the pace changed little last week. As Bloomberg News says:

"Claims, after see-sawing in prior weeks as the government had trouble adjusting the data for seasonal swings, are settling at a level that signals there is little change in the pace of firings from last year."

Also this morning, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said productivity at U.S. businesses fell at a 2 percent annual rate in the fourth quarter of 2012. While output went up 0.1 percent, the number of hours worked rose by 2.2 percent. So, Americans worked longer but output did not go up significantly. According to The Associated Press, much of the decline can be attributed to cutbacks at defense contractors.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

With Petition & Protest, Pressure Builds On José Andrés To Pull Out Of Trump Hotel

Local pressure is building on restaurateur José Andrés to sever his ties to Republican presidential contender Donald Trump, who in a speech said immigrants coming into the U.S. are criminals and "rapists."
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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