WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

O'Malley Testifies In Support Of Maryland Gun Control Bill

Play associated audio
Gun rights supporters rallied in front of the Maryland state house in Annapolis on Wednesday.
Matt Bush
Gun rights supporters rallied in front of the Maryland state house in Annapolis on Wednesday.

Hundreds lined up to speak at a state senate committee hearing in Annapolis on the gun control measures being pushed by Maryland governor Martin O'Malley.

Most of those in the line that snaked around two floors and out the door of the Miller Senate Building were there to speak in opposition to the governor's plan. O'Malley got to speak first, telling members of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee that strict licensing requirements he is seeking are not burdensome. They include making prospective buyers get the license first before they can buy a handgun.

"It's our belief that if car owners can take a driving test and obtain a license, it's reasonable to ask for safety training and a criminal background check in order to obtain a license for purchase of a handgun," O'Malley said.

O'Malley took questions from the committee, but left the detailed answers to staff and Baltimore County state's attorney Scott Shellenberger, who disagreed with two Republican senators who feel the licensing requirements are unconstitutional because they are too burdensome.

"If you have $650 to pay for a weapon that you deserve to have in your home, I don't think it's unreasonable to pay a reasonable cost to make sure you're the kind of person who has the right to carry the gun by doing a background check and by making sure you're properly trained," Shellenberger said.

GOP Sens. Christopher Shank and Nancy Jacobs both pointed to the Supreme Court's ruling that overturned D.C.'s handgun ban in 2008 in arguing that the new licensing would put too much of a burden on those wishing to buy handguns, and therefore unconstitutional.

NPR

Poetry Behind Bars: The Lines That Save Lives — Sometimes Literally

Words Unlocked, a poetry contest for juveniles in corrections, has drawn more than 1,000 entries. Its judge, Jimmy Santiago Baca, says it was a poetry book that helped him survive his own prison term.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

Trump And Cruz Campaign At California GOP Convention

The remaining Republican presidential candidates have been making their case at the party's state convention. Capital Public Radio's Ben Adler explains the divisions on display among Republicans.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.