Family Research Council Shooter Pleads Guilty | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Family Research Council Shooter Pleads Guilty

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A Virginia man entered a guilty plea in U.S. District Court to three counts related to the shooting of a security guard inside the downtown D.C. headquarters of a conservative Christian lobbing group.

Floyd Corkins was charged in August with opening fire inside the lobby of the Family Research Council building. A security guard was wounded but managed to wrestle away the gun.

He pleaded guilty Wednesday to one federal count of crossing state lines with guns and ammunition. He also pleaded guilty to one count of intent to kill while armed and one count of committing an act of terrorism with the intent to kill.

Corkins was carrying ammunition and Chick-fil-A sandwiches in his bag. Prosecutors said Wednesday that Corkins intended to smear the sandwiches in the faces of the shooting victims. Chick-fil-A was making headlines at the time because of its president's stated opposition to gay marriage.

Corkins told the judge that he intended to make a statement against gay rights opponents.

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