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Baltimore Welcomes Home Super Bowl Champion Ravens

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Baltimore residents turned out in force to welcome home their Super Bowl champion Ravens, who defeated the San Francisco 49ers 34-31 on Sunday night.

The parade began outside Baltimore City Hall at 10:45 a.m. with a formal welcome from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake. From there, the parade headed south on Commerce Street to Pratt and Howards Streets, to its final destination at the M&T Bank stadium.

Roger Elliott was in town for the last Ravens Super Bowl celebration 12 years ago. Elliott says he expects Tuesday's celebration will be equally massive.

"There was people all the way back to those steps of the war memorial building," Elliott says. "There was a good 30,000 or 40,000 people here just all packed in this plaza. I expect that it will be like that again of better after that season and that win."

Baltimore City councilwoman Mary Pat Clark says she had to be there for one reason.

"Just to be able to say thank you, thank you, thank you to the players and the organization, and to say how proud we all are of them," Clark says.

The parade and celebration are free for fans.

Live stream of Ravens' parade from NBC Washington:

View more videos at: http://nbcwashington.com.

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