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Coming Monday: A Daily Dose Of 'Book News'

For some months now, many of us at NPR have been enjoying a daily email from our friends here who report about books and the publishing industry. It's a tip sheet with news, and a bit of attitude.

Eyder and several others started saying "hey, we ought to publish this."

So, The Two-Way will.

Annalisa Quinn, who's been writing the notes, sends along this mission statement and a little bit about herself:

"Starting on Monday, NPR will give you a daily dose of bookish news and literary gossip. Our news is culled from the headlines, news wires, academic journals, press releases, and authors and publishers themselves. We hope to be the first source for publishing industry insiders and book lovers alike. And every Monday, we'll tell you about the best new releases of the week. We'd love to hear your hot tips, withering criticisms or wild speculations in the comments section.

"I write about books for and work with the NPR books team on the four Recommended Reads series:

-- You Must Read This

-- PG-13: Risky Reads

-- My Guilty Pleasure

-- Three Books

"Before joining NPR as the Books and Opinion intern in Fall 2012, I interned at Harvard University's Center for Hellenic Studies, studying Homeric textual criticism. I'm a May 2012 graduate of Georgetown University, with degrees in English and Classical Languages, and a special focus on ancient epics."

Please welcome Annalisa.

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