NPR : News

Filed Under:

Novartis Recalls Triaminic And Theraflu Cough Syrups

The Consumer Products Safety Commission says that "child-resistant" caps on some bottles of cough and flu syrup aren't as sturdy as advertised.

That's a problem, because products implicated in the agency's latest recall announcement — Triaminic and Theraflu syrups and "warming liquids" — contain acetaminophen and diphenhydramine.

Those drugs are responsible for tens of thousands of poisoning incidents in children each year. Acetaminophen in large doses can be especially damaging to the liver.

To avoid the risk of poisoning, the consumer agency advises users to stop using the products any Triaminic or Theraflu "warming liquid" purchased between May 2010 and December 2011.

Novartis, the pharmaceutical company that makes the products, has received 12 reports of children unscrewing the caps on the faulty products. Four of those kids ingested the product, and one needed medical attention.

But it might be too late, anyway. A Novartis spokeswoman tells ABC News that an estimated 97 percent of the recalled syrups have already been consumed, returned or quarantined in a warehouse.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
WAMU 88.5

State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

Surfers And Scientists Team Up To Create The 'Perfect Wave'

Surfers once deemed man-made waves weak and mushy compared to the best that break along the coast. Then engineers and an 11-time world champion surfer showed just how good an artificial wave can be.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.