NPR : News

Filed Under:

Novartis Recalls Triaminic And Theraflu Cough Syrups

The Consumer Products Safety Commission says that "child-resistant" caps on some bottles of cough and flu syrup aren't as sturdy as advertised.

That's a problem, because products implicated in the agency's latest recall announcement — Triaminic and Theraflu syrups and "warming liquids" — contain acetaminophen and diphenhydramine.

Those drugs are responsible for tens of thousands of poisoning incidents in children each year. Acetaminophen in large doses can be especially damaging to the liver.

To avoid the risk of poisoning, the consumer agency advises users to stop using the products any Triaminic or Theraflu "warming liquid" purchased between May 2010 and December 2011.

Novartis, the pharmaceutical company that makes the products, has received 12 reports of children unscrewing the caps on the faulty products. Four of those kids ingested the product, and one needed medical attention.

But it might be too late, anyway. A Novartis spokeswoman tells ABC News that an estimated 97 percent of the recalled syrups have already been consumed, returned or quarantined in a warehouse.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

'National Review' On How Donald Trump Is Changing The Campaign

The prominent conservative magazine National Review dedicated a whole issue to denouncing Donald Trump. Editor Rich Lowry talks about how Trump is reshaping the state of conservatism.
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.