Death Toll Rising In Mexico; At Least 32 Dead After Explosion, More Than 100 Hurt | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Death Toll Rising In Mexico; At Least 32 Dead After Explosion, More Than 100 Hurt

Authorities in Mexico City said Friday morning that at least 32 people had been killed and another 120 or so injured by the explosion Thursday afternoon at the headquarters of Pemex, Mexico's state-owned oil company.

Both figures are up from where the story stood Thursday night (it was being reported then that there were at least 14 dead and 80 injured), when we were following the news as it came in from Mexico City.

There's a chance the grim figures will shift again in coming hours. According to The Associated Press, rescuers continue to search for victims who might trapped in the debris. The explosion reportedly caused extensive damage to the 51-story building's first few floors. It also shattered many windows on upper floors.

As NPR's Carrie Kahn tells our Newscast Desk, the cause of the explosion hasn't yet been determined.

(We updated this post at 11:45 a.m. ET with higher death and injury totals based on the latest news from Mexico. When the day began, the death toll stood at 25 and the number injured was said to be about 100.)

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The musicians and artists of Baghdad work under a government that prefers religious festivals to classical concerts. But with a little cunning, they're finding ways to keep the arts alive.
NPR

'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words And Ketchup

Linguist Dan Jurafsky uncovers the fishy origins of ketchup and how it forces us to rethink global history. He also teaches us how to read a menu to figure out how much a restaurant may charge.
NPR

Tommy Boggs, Influential Lobbyist, Dies At 73

Boggs changed the lobbying profession by recognizing how power in Washington was becoming more diffuse.
NPR

Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims

Cyberstalking has transformed domestic abuse in the U.S. Tracking tools called spyware make it cheap and easy for someone to monitor a partner secretly, 24 hours a day.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.