WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. CFO Natwar Gandhi Resigns

Play associated audio
Natwar Gandhi outside a D.C. Council hearing in December.
Patrick Madden
Natwar Gandhi outside a D.C. Council hearing in December.

Natwar Gandhi, the District of Columbia's chief financial officer, is stepping down. Gandhi intends to retire effective June 1, he informed Mayor Vincent Gray in a letter Friday.

The letter does give a reason for Gandhi's resignation. He has served in the position for 15 years and was appointed to a new, five-year term last year. Gandhi's spokesman says the retirement is "for purely personal reasons."

Gandhi said in the letter it was not an easy decision, but he feels "comfortable" retiring at this time because the city is, in his words, "excellent financial condition." 

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson heralded Gandhi's tenure in a statement issued after the CFO's resignation.

"Stewardship of the District’s finances is the primary reason we have gone from junk bond status to double-A ratings on Wall Street," Mendelson said.

But there were also several scandals during his tenure, particularly in the Office of Tax and Revenue, which is under the control of the CFO. In 2007, OTR employee Harriet Walters was caught stealing more than $50 million. More recently, the tax office has been criticized for a lack of oversight and and there is an ongoing investigation into how city officials handled a lucrative lottery contract, which is the subject of a federal investigation.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.