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Son Of Rep. Jim Moran Won't Be Charged For Voter Fraud

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Rep. Jim Moran's son, Pat Moran, resigned from his father's campaign after a secretly recorded video showing Moran appear to discuss potential voter fraud with a supporter was released.
David Schultz
Rep. Jim Moran's son, Pat Moran, resigned from his father's campaign after a secretly recorded video showing Moran appear to discuss potential voter fraud with a supporter was released.

Police say they won't file any charges against the son of Democratic Congressman Jim Moran of Virginia, who was captured in an undercover video discussing a plan to cast fraudulent ballots.

Arlington County police announced Thursday that Patrick Moran will not be charged. Police say the decision was made in collaboration with county prosecutors and the Virginia Attorney General's office, according to the Associated Press.

The video was posted online in October by Project Veritas, an organization led by conservative activist James O'Keefe. It showed an undercover operative pitching a voter-fraud plan to Patrick Moran, who is seen telling the volunteer to "look into it.'' Patrick Moran resigned as field director of his father's campaign after the video was posted.

Police say the producers of the video did not cooperate in the investigation.

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