Va. Student Wins Appeal On Full-Body Scans In Airports | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Va. Student Wins Appeal On Full-Body Scans In Airports

Play associated audio

The Transportation Security Administration will remove most full-body scanners from U.S. airports by June, according to agency officials. It's good news for Aaron Tobey of Charlottesville, Va., man who alleges the machines violated his constitutional rights.

Tobey was heading back to college in Ohio in December 2010 when he staged a novel protest at Richmond's airport. He stripped down to his shorts, revealing the words of the fourth amendment to the U.S. Constitution on his chest.

"The right of the people to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure shall not be violated," quotes Tobey's lawyer, John Whitehead. He and his client agree that full body scans and pat downs at airports go too far.

But TSA didn't see it that way. Aaron Tobey was polite in making his protest, but police arrested him anyway.

"They grabbed him, took him downstairs and for 90 minutes went through a series of questions to see if he was a terrorist," Whitehead says. "All you had to do was google to see he was a fifth-year architecture student at the University of Cincinnati."

Tobey was charged with breach of the peace and disruptive conduct, charges dismissed by a state court. Later, he sued the federal government. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals last week affirmed an earlier ruling that Tobey's First Amendment rights were violated.

Meanwhile, the federal government is planning to move approximately 250 of the unpopular machines out of U.S. airports and into various government agencies concerned about security. New scanners that use less controversial radio waves will replace the full-body scan machines.

NPR

Dressing Up As A T-Rex Is All Part Of The Job

Remember in Empire Strikes Back where Han Solo slices open the belly of a tauntaun so Luke can stay warm? That's not much different from how Eli Presser climbs into his T-Rex costume.
NPR

Plot To Poison Famed French Wine Makes For Gripping (Pinot) Noir

In Shadows in the Vineyard Maximillian Potter tells the true story of the legendary Romanée-Conti vineyard — and how it was held up for a 1 million euro ransom.
NPR

Congress Leaves Town Next Week, But Will Anyone Notice?

Next week is Congress's last before summer recess, which is often when a flurry of bills are pushed through Congress. This year, not so much, NPR's Ron Elving tells NPR's Scott Simon.
NPR

Tech Week: Industry Diversity, Digital Afterlives, Net Neutrality

The roundup: Twitter released a scorecard showing that its workforce is largely male and white. And what happens to our digital stuff after we log off for the last time?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.