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Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood Stepping Down

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U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood will step down as soon as a replacement is found.
Martin Di Caro
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood will step down as soon as a replacement is found.

The only Republican in President Obama's cabinet says he won't stick around for his second term; U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood has announced his resignation, effective when his successor is confirmed.

President Obama issued a statement thanking LaHood "for his dedication, his hard work, and his years of service to the American people."

LaHood crusaded nationally against distracted driving. He also worked to reform the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, whose shady hiring and contracting practices were detailed in a Department of Transportation audit. LaHood also praised the airports authority's handling of the Silver Line Metro rail project, calling it a model. 

LaHood departs as MWAA awaits word if the secretary will approve a large federal loan to help fund the $5.5 billion rail line. Earlier this month, LaHood said he was optimistic that it would be approved "sooner rather than later."

In a statement, MWAA chief executive Jack Potter praised LaHood for "exemplary leadership as a strong and consistent champion of initiatives to enhance the safety and efficiency of the transportation system."


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