WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia House Delays Vote On Senate Redistricting

Play associated audio
Republican Speaker Bill Howell presides over the House of Delegates in Richmond.
Creative Commons
Republican Speaker Bill Howell presides over the House of Delegates in Richmond.

Virginia's House of Delegates gaveled into session Thursday at noon, only a few hours after the Comedy Central show, The Colbert Report, lampooned a Republican-led effort to redraw state Senate districts to benefit Republicans. Because the GOP waited until a Democratic senator was out of town for the inauguration, Colbert dubbed Virginia Republicans "Alpha Dogs of the Week." Charlottesville Del. David Toscano took the House floor and said the redistricting plan was troubling.

"In one district, 92 percent of the people were moved around to create a new Senate district," says Toscano. "I'd submit to you that's hardly a technical adjustment."

At the end of the House session, the clerk announced that the effort had been delayed yet again.

House leaders could take the bill up today or they could delay it indefinitely. If the Republican-dominated House of Delegates approves the redistricting plan, Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell will have to make a decision — does he want to veto the bill and anger Republicans or pass the bill and potentially jeopardize his transportation package? Analysts at the Virginia Center for Politics say McDonnell has a third option — he could theoretically let the bill become law without his signature.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
NPR

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.
NPR

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source software OpenSSL for their core business. Two-thirds of websites use it. But no one pays for it and it's never had a complete security audit.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.