Bus Driver Gets Six Years For Involuntary Manslaughter Charges | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Bus Driver Gets Six Years For Involuntary Manslaughter Charges

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The driver of a bus that crashed in Virginia killing four people will serve six years in prison on four involuntary manslaughter convictions.

Prosecutor Tony Spencer says Kin Yiu Cheung was sentenced yesterday in Caroline County Circuit Court in Bowling Green to 40 years with 34 years suspended.

The 38-year-old was convicted in November of charges stemming from the 2011 crash on I-95 about 30 miles north of Richmond.

The bus was en route from Greensboro, N.C., to New York. Witnesses described Cheung's erratic driving before the bus swerved off the road, hit an embankment and overturned.

A state trooper testified at the trial that Cheung nodded when asked whether he'd fallen asleep behind the wheel. Cheung's attorneys have called it a "horrendous accident.''

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