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Alexandria Reconsiders Bicycle Registration

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Few Alexandria bike owners even know about Alexandria's requirement to register bicycles.
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Few Alexandria bike owners even know about Alexandria's requirement to register bicycles.

City leaders in Alexandria are moving to end longstanding regulations requiring bicycle owners to register their bikes with the city, and pay a fee.

Back in 1963, city leaders adopted a city code that required all bicycle users to register with the city and pay a 25 cent registration fee. If that person sold the bike, a ten cent transfer fee applied.

Deputy City Attorney Chris Spera says it was a city code for a different era.

"The requirement in city code dates back to a much earlier time when bicycles were more rare," Spera says. "They were more like cars than they are today. Having a bicycle was a big deal."

Now city leaders are reconsidering that code as they look at bicycle regulation in Alexandria.

"The need for local registration of something like a bicycle is probably no longer necessary," Spera says. "If an owner is concerned about his or her bicycle being stolen and being able to track it, there is a National Bike Registry that serves that function."

City Council members are expected to review recommendations in the spring.

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