Reports: Shots Fired At Houston Community College | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Reports: Shots Fired At Houston Community College

Local news outlets are reporting that three people have been shot at a community college in north Houston.

KHOU reports three people were taken out of Lone Star College's north campus in stretchers. The news station adds that police say three people were shot — one of them is a suspect.

Television images from KTRK showed students streaming out the building, as well as first responders providing first aid to a person on a stretcher.

The Houston Chronicle reports:

"'We know that shots have been fired and we are in a shelter-in-place situation on the campus,' said Vicki Cassidy, manager of media relations for Lone Star College System. 'It's a pretty chaotic scene at this point in time.'

"Cassidy said she could not provide any other details about the shooting. The campus is one of six that makes up the community college system."

As tends to be the case, the situation on campus is chaotic so the details are still hard to pin down. We'll follow this and update this post.

If you're looking for live coverage, you can find it at KTRK and KHOU.

Update at 2:20 p.m. ET. Police Looking For Another Suspect:

According to the Houston Chronicle, which monitoring police scanners, another suspect "is being sought."

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