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Inauguration Attendees Should Plan Transportation Ahead Of Time

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A scene from the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station during President Obama's inauguration in 2009.
A scene from the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station during President Obama's inauguration in 2009.

With hundreds of thousands of people expected to ride Metrorail on Inauguration Day, the transit agency's general manager Richard Sarles is advising people to visit wmata.com to plan their trips before heading out the door in the morning.

He also says he hopes people filled their SmarTrip cards last week, as the lines at fare card machines will be long.

Another thing Metro riders should keep in mind is that three station will be closed on Monday — Smithsonian, Archives, and Mount Vernon Square.

For those that plan to bicycle into town, District transportation planner Jim Sebastian says there will be a large bike parking area at 16th and I Streets NW.

That's going to hold about 700 bikes, but riders should bring their own locks. It's not valet parking, but it will be supervised all day.

There will also be two special Capital Bikeshare drop off points set up for the event — one at Farragut Square in Northwest, and another at the Agriculture Department at 12th Street and Independence Avenue Southwest.


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