WAMU 88.5 : News

Inauguration Attendees Should Plan Transportation Ahead Of Time

Play associated audio
A scene from the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station during President Obama's inauguration in 2009.
A scene from the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station during President Obama's inauguration in 2009.

With hundreds of thousands of people expected to ride Metrorail on Inauguration Day, the transit agency's general manager Richard Sarles is advising people to visit wmata.com to plan their trips before heading out the door in the morning.

He also says he hopes people filled their SmarTrip cards last week, as the lines at fare card machines will be long.

Another thing Metro riders should keep in mind is that three station will be closed on Monday — Smithsonian, Archives, and Mount Vernon Square.

For those that plan to bicycle into town, District transportation planner Jim Sebastian says there will be a large bike parking area at 16th and I Streets NW.

That's going to hold about 700 bikes, but riders should bring their own locks. It's not valet parking, but it will be supervised all day.

There will also be two special Capital Bikeshare drop off points set up for the event — one at Farragut Square in Northwest, and another at the Agriculture Department at 12th Street and Independence Avenue Southwest.


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.