Inaugural Store Stays Open For Last-Minute Souvenir Buyers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Inaugural Store Stays Open For Last-Minute Souvenir Buyers

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Although the inauguration took place Monday, the Presidential Inaugural Committee plans to keep its official store in downtown D.C. open through Thursday, Jan. 24 — that is, if there's still anything left.

From the moment the store opened in mid-January, items were flying off the shelves. It's one of the few places in D.C. where inauguration goers can get official souvenirs from the Presidential Inaugural Committee.

"It's about collectibles, it's about memorabilia, and it's about capturing the moment of this historic event," says Megan Burke, merchandising director for the store. She also says this time around, there's something new that wasn't there during Obama's 2009 inauguration.

"Last time we had a toy train because we were bringing the president here on the train, and now it's the official motorcade."

Proceeds from the toy motorcades and other items in the store benefit inaugural activities that are not covered by taxpayer dollars, such as Saturday's National Day of Service event on the National Mall.

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