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Stephen Colbert's Sister Will Run For Congress

Elizabeth Colbert-Busch — a.k.a. Stephen Colbert's big sister — shook things up in South Carolina Friday, with the news that she will seek the House seat that was recently vacated by Sen. Tim Scott. The field already includes former Gov. Mark Sanford, who is attempting to repair his scandal-damaged political career.

Others who are vying to represent South Carolina's First Congressional District include Teddy Turner, son of Ted Turner.

Both Sanford and Turner will seek the Republican nomination; Colbert-Busch will file the paperwork to be on the Democratic ticket Tuesday, the party's Amanda Loveday tells the St. Andrews Patch. Her competition for the Democratic slot on the ballot includes millionaire Martin Skelley, who began his bid Friday by loaning his campaign $250,000.

Colbert-Busch, 58, is the business development director at Clemson University's Restoration Institute in Charleston, where she and her comedian younger brother grew up.

"She does have a famous brother, but she has a great story to tell," her new campaign manager, Bill Romjue, tells The State. "She's a very successful woman."

Colbert-Busch has told some of her story before, in a 2010 profile piece that ran in The Post and Courier.

Primaries are scheduled for March 19; the election will be held on May 7.

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