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Virginia Bill Seeks To Confiscate Guns

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Alexandria Democratic Del. Rob Krupicka has introduced legislation that would expand powers to allow law-enforcement officials to confiscate guns. The bill also creates requirements for health officials to report individuals who have threatened to harm others or themselves.

"The way the bill is written, it doesn't take guns away indefinitely," he says. "There's a due process that allows people to get their guns back."

Republican Del. Dave Albo says he wants to be careful about who gets to determine what constitutes a threat. But he adds that removing weapons from the hands of dangerous people is a goal many Republicans share.

"When you are talking about an eminent threat of bodily injury or death, I would find it hard to believe that there would be anybody against that if you could make the bill work," he says.

The Virginia Citizens Defense League has already signaled it will oppose the bill, because it might discourage people from seeking mental health treatment.

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