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New Internal Watchdog Appointed To MWAA

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The MWAA has authority over area airports, including Dulles Airport.
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The MWAA has authority over area airports, including Dulles Airport.

The board that manages two of the Washington area's airports is getting a new internal watchdog. The move comes in the wake of criticism from local, state and federal officials about a lack of transparency and questionable practices by the board.

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood announced Monday that Lynn Deavers has been appointed as the accountability officer for the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

In addition to running Ronald Reagan National and Washington Dulles International airports, the board is overseeing the $6 billion expansion of Metrorail service to Dulles.

A recent federal audit criticized the airports board for relying on no-bid contracts and accepting expensive gifts from contractors.

Deavers replaces Kim Moore, who's taking a job with the House transportation committee.  Deavers will work on ethics and management reforms until Congress appoints a permanent inspector general for the authority.

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