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Bethesda Speed Camera Not Moving Despite Court Ruling

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Maryland police have no intention to move an offending traffic camera.
Dave Dugdale: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davedugdale/4960258290/
Maryland police have no intention to move an offending traffic camera.

Police in Montgomery County will not be moving the location of a speed camera, despite a court ruling that overturned a ticket it issued.

Noted attorney and anti-tax activist Robin Ficker went to court to fight a speeding ticket that was issued by a camera stationed in the 4300 block of Jones Bridge Road in Bethesda between Connecticut and Wisconsin Avenues. Ficker argued the camera's location did not fit under Maryland law, saying it was not within 300 feet of a residence, and a district court judge ruled in his favor and voided Ficker's $40 ticket. 

Even with that ruling, Montgomery County police won't be moving the camera. They say the law allows for cameras on roads that have 300 feet of residences, not that the camera must be within 300 feet of any residence. 

The department says it has no plans to review any other tickets that were issued by the camera.

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