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Free Flu Vaccinations Available In Prince George's County

Two health clinics in Prince George's County are giving out free flu shots today.
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Two health clinics in Prince George's County are giving out free flu shots today.

As cases of the flu continue to rise in Maryland, residents will be able to get free flu vaccinations today in Prince George's County.

The county will run two walk-in clinics — one at the Cheverly Health Center Immunization Clinic and the other at the Dyer Regional Health Center in Clinton.

Appointments are not needed for either clinic, and the vaccine being offered is delivered via a nasal spray. Free vaccines are also being offered today the Glen Burnie Health Center in Anne Arundel County.

State health officials say flu is widespread across Maryland, but there are signs it may be stabilizing. Most of the recent cases involve people over 65.

Flu vaccinations are recommended for anyone 6 months or older.

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