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American History Museum Taking Submissions For Farming Exhibit

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Artifacts of American agricultural history will be the centerpieces of an exhibit in 2015.
Aaron Frutman: http://www.flickr.com/photos/34495711@N06/3613297380/
Artifacts of American agricultural history will be the centerpieces of an exhibit in 2015.

The National Museum of American History is working on a new exhibit to showcase America's farming and ranching industries.

Museum curators are working with the American Farm Bureau Federation to put together a collection of photographs, objects, and first hand accounts that help tell the story of how farming and ranching have evolved in rural America during last 70 years.

A Tennessee farmer made the first donation to the future exhibition: a computer cow tag system, and photographs showing how his dairy farm modernized, evolving from a hand-labor intensive process to a computer-run operation.

The Smithsonian plans to open a web portal in March to collect stories and photographs from those who want to contribute to the exhibit online.

The exhibition is set to open in 2015.

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