A Supreme Court Justice Gets Personal: Sotomayor's Family Photos | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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A Supreme Court Justice Gets Personal: Sotomayor's Family Photos

A few weeks ago, a few of us headed over to the Supreme Court to retrieve a suitcase. It belonged to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and it contained, effectively, her family history in photographs. We sat in the kitchen in her chambers over her lunch break. She ate a bowl of soup and told us stories about the photos.

NPR's Nina Totenberg went back a few weeks later to get Sotomayor's full story (airing throughout the week): a childhood in tenement housing in the Bronx; a diagnosis with diabetes; her father's death to alcoholism; her cousin's death to drugs; and her divorce.

She also shares memories of huge family parties, cooking with her grandmother and receiving a scholarship to Princeton (and her corollary thoughts on affirmative action).

Without further delay, check out the presentation, in which Sotomayor shares her photos and stories.

(P.S. Hey, other justices: We're currently accepting suitcases of photos.)

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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