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Military Bands Polish Their Acts Before Inauguration Day

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The 99 piece Air Force band practices in a hangar in preparation for their parade performance on Inauguration Day.
US Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Cecilio M. Ricardo
The 99 piece Air Force band practices in a hangar in preparation for their parade performance on Inauguration Day.

The Presidential Inauguration is just 10 days away, and the servicemen and women who will participate are making their final preparations.

Inside Hangar 3 at Andrews Air Force Base, the Air Force Marching Band and the Air Force Color Guard are practicing the maneuvers they will present to the president as they march past the viewingstand.

This will be the fourth inaugural where Drum Sgt. Maj. Edward Teleky leads the President's Own, as the Air Force band is called.

"Its very important for our military and for us to represent the military and our members on the front lines at this time," says Teleky. "Especially the folks that are deployed and defending our country and our interests globally."

Airman Nicholas Giusti is from Frederick, Md., and this will be his first inaugural.

"I feel honored to be able to walk down Constitution Avenue in front of the White House in front of Presidents," says Giusti. "It's a very prestigious event and I'm just happy to be a part of it."

The men and women in U.S. military uniform will do more than march during the inaugural; more than 5,000 active, reserve and guard members representing all branches of the military will provide security and other services, as well as line the parade route and salute the president as he makes his way from the Capitol to the White House.

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