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Inauguration Store Opens Blocks From White House

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On its opening day, the store run by the Presidential Inaugural Committee was packed.
Markette Smith
On its opening day, the store run by the Presidential Inaugural Committee was packed.

The Presidential Inaugural Committee opened it official memorabilia store Friday, and items are already flying off the shelves.

Ballou Senior High School's marching band from Southeast Washington played as hundreds of people packed into the store at 1155 F Street NW, just blocks from the White House, in a scene that was reminiscent of a Black Friday sale.

Inside are everything from lapel pins to shot glasses, t-shirts to tube socks, with a few high fashion items from designers Vera Wang and Rachel Roy.

But the one item that is flying off the shelves like hot cakes? Buttons.

The store offers one button for free, and after that, 2 for $5.

This shopping frenzy, according to Presidential Inaugural Committee member Marlon Marshall, is all for a good cause.

"Things like the proceeds from here today go to the day of service, which is something that is obviously very important to the president," Marshall says. "It's one of the main things I'm working on. We're going to have a big event on the National Mall. We're going to have over 100 service projects that people can do right on the spot."

The National Day of Service is Saturday, Jan. 19. The store will remain open through Jan. 24.

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