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Virginia Lawmakers Debate Abortion Rights Again

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About 300 demonstrators gathered at the Virginia state house for song, prayer and speeches, as lawmakers again debated restrictions on abortion and contraception.

Rev. Daniel Boone of the Valley View Church in Buchanan, Va. hopes a bill introduced by Sen. Tom Garrett of Lynchburg will pass. It would bar the state from paying for abortions when low-income women are told their fetus has gross physical or mentally incapacitating deformities.

"These women are going through a terrible time," says Cianti Stewart-Reed, executive director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Virginia. "Their pregnancies have gone terribly wrong, and they don't have the money to terminate these pregnancies."

The legislative session lasts about 45 days. In that time, lawmakers may also consider undoing a health department requirement that abortion clinics meet architectural requirements written for new hospitals; a rule that threatens to close most clinics in the state. Virginia must also decide whether to expand Medicaid as part of health care reform.

The federal government has pledged to pay the full cost of expansion.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
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Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

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