Baseball Will Test For Human Growth Hormone During Season | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Baseball Will Test For Human Growth Hormone During Season

Major League Baseball will expand its effort to fight performance enhancing drugs to include random blood tests for human growth hormone and other substances during the regular season, under the terms of an agreement with the players union that was first reported by The New York Times.

"This is a very proud day for baseball," MLB Commissioner Bud Selig said as he announced the new tests Thursday afternoon.

The testing program calls for a World Anti-Doping Agency-certified laboratory in Montreal to establish "baseline testosterone readings" for all players, in a move that targets the use of synthetic testosterone.

The deal's unveiling comes one day after the Baseball Writers of America returned their Hall of Fame ballots for the class of 2013 without selecting any recently retired players — a rare move that many are interpreting as a sign that the sport's recent "steroid era" eclipsed the accomplished careers of former stars such as Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds.

Like anabolic steroids, federal law prohibits the use of human growth hormone unless it is prescribed by a doctor, according to the Justice Department. The agency says the misuse of human growth hormone by adults "poses a wide array of serious side effects, including significant cardiovascular disease, irreversible enlargement of the heart, and development of polyps and malignancies of the colon."

Injections of human growth hormone have been credited with "reducing body fat and increasing skeletal muscle mass," according to the FDA. It is also said to help shorten athletes' recovery time.

In 2011, both MLB and the NFL said that they would test for human growth hormone, but neither fully delivered on that promise. MLB instituted a testing program that omitted taking blood samples during the regular season; the NFL postponed its plans after players voiced concerns. Part of their worry, reportedly, has been how having their blood taken might affect their performance.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
WAMU 88.5

Food Packaging & Pricing

Have you ever popped open a bag of potato chips only to be disappointed by the number of crisps in your bag? It's not just you. To avoid raising prices, companies often increase their "nonfunctional slack fill" or the difference between the volume of product and its container. We talk about how food packaging affects your recipe and wallet.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: The Growing Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement

A look at the growing fossil fuel divestment movement.

NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.