NPR : News

Filed Under:

Baseball Will Test For Human Growth Hormone During Season

Major League Baseball will expand its effort to fight performance enhancing drugs to include random blood tests for human growth hormone and other substances during the regular season, under the terms of an agreement with the players union that was first reported by The New York Times.

"This is a very proud day for baseball," MLB Commissioner Bud Selig said as he announced the new tests Thursday afternoon.

The testing program calls for a World Anti-Doping Agency-certified laboratory in Montreal to establish "baseline testosterone readings" for all players, in a move that targets the use of synthetic testosterone.

The deal's unveiling comes one day after the Baseball Writers of America returned their Hall of Fame ballots for the class of 2013 without selecting any recently retired players — a rare move that many are interpreting as a sign that the sport's recent "steroid era" eclipsed the accomplished careers of former stars such as Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds.

Like anabolic steroids, federal law prohibits the use of human growth hormone unless it is prescribed by a doctor, according to the Justice Department. The agency says the misuse of human growth hormone by adults "poses a wide array of serious side effects, including significant cardiovascular disease, irreversible enlargement of the heart, and development of polyps and malignancies of the colon."

Injections of human growth hormone have been credited with "reducing body fat and increasing skeletal muscle mass," according to the FDA. It is also said to help shorten athletes' recovery time.

In 2011, both MLB and the NFL said that they would test for human growth hormone, but neither fully delivered on that promise. MLB instituted a testing program that omitted taking blood samples during the regular season; the NFL postponed its plans after players voiced concerns. Part of their worry, reportedly, has been how having their blood taken might affect their performance.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Trump's Cyber Comments Rouse The Democrats

As they bolster their case that Hillary Clinton is ready to be commander in chief, Democrats are seizing on Donald Trump's comments seemingly encouraging Russia to use cyber-espionage against Clinton.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.