NPR : News

Reports: Obama Has Settled On Jack Lew, His Chief Of Staff, For Treasury

White House Chief of Staff Jack Lew, as expected, is President Obama's choice to be the next treasury secretary, both Bloomberg News and The Associated Press are reporting.

Bloomberg, which broke the story, says it's getting that word from "a person familiar with the process" and that the announcement will be made Thursday. The AP is citing "sources." NPR has not independently confirmed the news.

Lew would replace Timothy Geithner, who earlier announced that he wants to leave the administration early in the president's second term.

The 57-year-old Lew, as NPR's Mara Liasson reported in December, "has had years of experience toiling in the fiscal trenches. ... Before he was White House chief of staff, Lew was Obama's budget director — a job he'd also held in the Clinton White House. After serving in the Clinton administration, Lew followed the well-worn path from White House to Wall Street."

Bloomberg wraps up his resume this way:

"As a former aide to the late House Speaker Tip O'Neill, a Massachusetts Democrat, and a two-time director of the Office of Management and Budget, Lew has experience on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue. He's spent most of his career in government, with a brief detour to Wall Street, where he worked as a managing director for Citigroup from July 2006 until joining the administration when Obama first took office."

The other choices the president has announced for top posts:

-- Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., to be secretary of state.

-- Former Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., to be secretary of defense.

-- Counterterrorism adviser John Brennan to be CIA director.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Smithsonian Sets Phasers To Restore On Original Starship Enterprise

The Starship Enterprise — from the original Star Trek series — has gotten a restoration fit for a real life spacecraft. It goes on display this week at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.
NPR

Click For Fewer Calories: Health Labels May Change Online Ordering Habits

Will it be a hamburger or hummus wrap for lunch? When customers saw indications of a meal's calorie content posted online, they put fewer calories in their cart, a study finds.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.