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Connolly Advocates To Allow Cameras In Supreme Court

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Virginia Rep. Gerry Connolly introduced legislation to bring cameras into the Supreme Court.
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Virginia Rep. Gerry Connolly introduced legislation to bring cameras into the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court is the most secretive branch of government. Its proceedings are open to the public, but seating is severely limited. When it hears major cases, large crowds are forced to wait outside. That's why Virginia Rep. Gerry Connolly introduced legislation to bring cameras into the highest court in the land.

"They're a branch of government," he says. "They're not some mystical priesthood. And they have to be accountable to the public, just like the other two branches, and especially since they're appointed for life and they don't have to submit to an election, to the voters, all the more reason we've got to have some minimal process of accountability."

Critics say cameras could taint the high court though. They point to Congress, which has become increasingly polarized since C-SPAN's cameras were flipped on in the House in 1979. Congressional committees meet less now, and when they do lawmakers often play to the cameras instead of truly debating weighty issues. Connolly brushes aside those fears.

"Those who want to argue that will have to tell me how you could any further politicize a court that s already pretty politicized."

Connolly's legislation is co-sponsored by Texas Republican Ted Poe, a former district attorney and judge.

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