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Cellular Companies Add More Towers For Inauguration

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Many cell phone users experienced dropped calls during Obama's first inauguration in 2009.
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Many cell phone users experienced dropped calls during Obama's first inauguration in 2009.

Organizers for this month's presidential inauguration say they're trying to prevent the kind of overload of the wireless system caused by the huge crowd four years ago.

Representatives at AT&T, which only had a couple of towers in the area back in 2009, reports the company will have nine temporary cell towers running the length of the mall and others along the parade route.

Officials from Sprint say they're erecting three temporary towers around the mall and deploying another system to help with emergency communications.

Sen. Charles Schumer, Chairman of the Joint Congressional Committee on the Inauguration, says they're taking measures to ensure people can call, tweet and post messages on Facebook because the inauguration is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

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