WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Congress Approves $9B In Federal Flood Insurance For Sandy Victims

Play associated audio
Maryland families inundanted by Hurricane Sandy can finally draw on federal flood insurance.
Bryan Russo
Maryland families inundanted by Hurricane Sandy can finally draw on federal flood insurance.

Families in the D.C. region who were impacted by Superstorm Sandy will soon be able to get flood insurance claims paid by the federal government.

While the bulk of the superstorm's wreckage is in New York and New Jersey, it still damaged many homes in the region. More than 800 families in Maryland alone have already filed claims to access federal flood insurance money.

Maryland Democratic Congressman Steny Hoyer says it's good that Republican leaders brought the more than $9 billion flood insurance bill to the floor, but he says Congress still needs to send more than $50 billion to storm victims.

"While it is never too late to do the right thing, it is late that we are doing this thing. And we are doing only the bare minimum, because the flood insurance will expire," Hoyer says.

Maryland Republican Andy Harris represents the Eastern Shore, which received some of the worst damage in Maryland, but he opposed the measure along with 66 other Republicans. Harris argues the price of the bill ought to have been offset with cuts elsewhere in the budget.

NPR

'Game Of Thrones' Evolves On Women In Explosive Sixth Season

The sixth season of HBO's Game of Thrones showed a real evolution in the way the show portrays women and in the season finale, several female characters ascended to power. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Glen Weldon from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour and Greta Johnsen, host of the Nerdette podcast, about the show.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, the fourth-largest poultry company in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
NPR

Democrats' Report on Benghazi Attack: Hillary Clinton Was 'Active And Engaged'

Democrats on the panel unveiled their findings to get out in front of a Republican-led committee report that is expected to be far more critical of Clinton's handling of the Benghazi attacks.
WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.